Lending a voice to protect Indigenous Peoples

Lending a voice to protect Indigenous Peoples

Natalie Contreras, an Adobe employee and advocate for the rights of Indigenous peoples.

By Adobe Life Team

Posted on 08-12-2021

August 9 marked International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. Established in 1994, the day commemorates the first meeting of the UN Working Group on Indigenous Populations. The day is celebrated across the globe with cultural performances and events to bring awareness to issues affecting the world’s Indigenous communities.

To honor this holiday, we talked with Natalie Contreras, an Adobe employee and advocate for the rights of Indigenous peoples. Natalie joined Adobe through the Adobe Digital Academy, which offers individuals from nontraditional backgrounds an accelerated path to launching successful tech careers. She now manages the Adobe Digital Academy program, including the current cohort of interns and the alumni community networks.

Can you share a little about your heritage?

I identify as a multi-lineage descendant. My mom’s family is from the states in Northern Mexico of Michoacán, which is home to the Purépecha nation, and Durango, which is inhabited by the Tepehuán people. My dad’s family is from Mexico City and Jalisco, and those are Coca and Guachichil territories. My grandparents from both sides were in the Braceros Program as contract farm workers in the U.S. and eventually settled in what is now San Francisco, in the Mission District.

Why do you feel that Indigenous history is important?

I deeply appreciate the Mesoamerican cosmovision — that’s the larger interconnected scope of the Indigenous peoples across what some called “Turtle Island” (North America and South America). I connect to my Indigenous identity through traditional dance and song from these cultures. It’s a way to feel that interconnectedness with other communities.

I also want to acknowledge I’m a visitor on ancestral land of Indigenous Peoples. Where I was born, San Francisco, is known as Ramaytush Ohlone territory of the Yelamu tribe, and the names of the primary villages that were occupied by the Yelamu included a village site called Chutchui along Mission Creek, which is present-day Mission Dolores. It is important for me to speak on this because it’s important to acknowledge and center Indigenous people who have known and stewarded a relationship to the land, and whose descendants are alive today reclaiming their cultural heritage and traditions. I think it’s important to always give remembrance to the folks whose space I occupy.

Natalie dressed in traditional garb.

How did you start with traditional song and dance, and how does that allow you to connect with your heritage?

I was taking an ethnic studies class the summer before I went to college, and we had to do a presentation about cultural traditions. I begged my sister to take me across the bridge to a practice for a group that someone had started in the East Bay.

I really remember that day — as soon as I got out of the car, I could hear the drumming inside. When I opened the door, I was totally immersed, because you don’t just hear the music. You feel it.

I’ve now been dancing for over 12 years, with weekly practice and attending ceremonies like Indigenous Peoples Day on Alcatraz, as well as meeting with other Kalpullis who visit. Kalpulli is what we call these groups; it’s a Náhuatl word meaning house. It’s really cool because it’s all very intergenerational, and I love seeing it continue to represent many diasporas.

Why is International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples important?

There are people all over the world who are working against resource extraction in their communities, fighting for the right for sovereignty. It’s important to honor them and bring that global awareness to protect not just culture and traditions, but also the environment.

I’ve learned that Indigenous identity means being so much a part of the land that it no longer belongs to you; you are an essence of that land. We protect and we honor what we know is source and sustenance. It’s not just for ourselves — it’s for everyone.

How has the pandemic affected Indigenous communities?

In communities that were already facing a lack of resources and funding, the pandemic exacerbated those differences. The mortality rates are basically unheard of in some areas, and I think that’s being felt on a global scale. It has particularly endangered the elder community, which risks the loss of important culture, language, and history.

Simultaneously, some also had to evacuate due to wildfires in California last year. I wanted to help rally Indigenous leadership and give them tools and resources to help. I actually got to use my web development skills to help create a landing page for a local native tribe on the coast to help distribute relief grants across the community. We made the site accessible to people of all ages so community members could quickly update addresses and other information, which allowed relief to be distributed faster.

How can people help Indigenous communities?

That’s a really big question. Consider: What responsibility do I have? What can I contribute? How can I lend my voice?

I hope to raise awareness on the struggles of Indigenous people who are fighting for their right to access basic human rights, safe drinking water and sovereignty, and also to the disproportionate violence towards Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women Girls & Two Spirit relatives.

Here in the Bay Area, the Ohlone people are fighting to protect ancestral land and repatriate remains of traditional shellmounds. We also see headlines about the discovery of remains of Indigenous children in Canada. It’s critical to acknowledge and understand Indigenous issues and atrocities in order to make progress.

I encourage people to visit the Native Land app project to know the name of the people whose land you occupy; explore the Sogorea Te’ Land Trust, a matriarch-led group that advocates for the return of land to Indigenous people; and overall strive to understand local Indigenous perspectives.

Whether it’s lending your voice or supporting organizations that are doing work on the ground, you have lots of opportunities to raise awareness and defend Indigenous people.

Topics: #AdobeForAll, Brand, Adobe Life, Responsibility, Adobe Culture, Diversity & Inclusion

Products:

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How to Write a Press Release in 2021: Tips for Beginners

Press releases should be an integral part of marketing for businesses.

You must be wondering why.

According to Forbes, press releases can help you achieve a variety of goals such as improving your content marketing and SEO and sending a message.

The idea here is not only to increase visibility but also to build brand authority.

That being said, if you don’t know how to write a press release, you can find the process somewhat challenging.

Hence, here’s a comprehensive guide for beginners along with a few helpful tips that will aid you in drafting an effective press release to boost your brand.

Why do Businesses need a Press Release?

Press releases often function as news releases and are meant to inform your audience about some kind of event or information. The news you cover in press releases can be breaking or just a simple announcement about your new product release. In any case, press releases primarily serve several goals and will help you achieve a variety of business aims.

Let’s look at some of them.

Gives you good media coverage

When your company releases a new product/service/feature, you can create a press release and publish it on your website. Or submit it to several press release websites. Media outlets take their news information from the press release and cover it, spreading the word about your business.

Alternatively, you could get in touch with a few media publications to get your press release published. For instance, a tech product company could get its press release posted under the tech news on a media website.

Improves your branding

Not only can well-written press releases shape your brand image, but they can also help you improve your brand’s reputation and authority. This way, press releases can also be useful in times of crisis when you need to clear things up and address rumors about your business.

Press releases essentially serve as a mouthpiece for your brand. And it’s up to you how to make the most of it.

Increases your website’s ranking

Precisely because you will be getting more media coverage, you can expect to get more backlinks to your website. This means that your site’s SEO will improve over time and you can expect it to rank higher in search results. It also will help you in building brand credibility.

And besides, such results will come at a relatively low cost considering that you can be writing press releases yourself.

What are the different types of Press Releases?

Something that can come as a surprise to some business owners is that there are different types of press releases you can choose from. Knowing what kind of press release you will be writing is vital for you to be able to write the said release in the best way possible. Here are the most common types of press releases you can leverage:

Product Updates and New Product Launches

Probably the most common type of press release that you will be using regularly is the one for announcing product updates and new product launches. These can be used for the products and/or services you offer to inform your audience about the improvements you made to them.

Additionally, such press releases announce product launches to hype up the offer that will soon be available to your customers. Product Update and Launch press releases focus on product specifications, pricing, availability, updates (if applicable), etc.

Mergers, Acquisitions, and Partnerships

Some press releases you write will be used to announce big changes in your company such as mergers and acquisitions. In this case, you will need to clearly describe all the organizations involved.

Alternatively, you may be partnering with another company which is also a reason to publish a press release. In such press releases, you will also need to describe the company you are working with and explain why you are partnering, what your aims are, and so on.

Events and Grand Openings

While the previous type of press releases focuses on changes inside the company, press releases covering events and grand openings are more about what’s outside of your business.

When you are hosting some kind of event, you must publish a press release so that the news outlets reporting on it can spread the word. Remember to note important details like attendance fee, dates, and location, notable guests, etc. In a way, grand openings are also an event (e.g. new offices or relocation). Likewise, you should note all the necessary details.

Executive Promotions

When there is a high-profile promotion at your business or a new executive is hired, you should create a press release for it. High-profile executives are the face of your company, so you need to let your audience know that there has been an internal change in your company.

Such press releases are a way to establish the executive’s credibility and set them up as a representative of your brand.

Rebranding

At some point, you may find that your company’s brand no longer works the way it used to – and that’s when you’ll decide to rebrand. In such situations, a timely press release can help you make the rebranding process much smoother.

In the press release, explain the reasons for rebranding and the details about it. You can even quote some of your executives when talking about the matter.

Awards

The last press release you will find helpful is one about awards. From time to time, it’s a good idea to brag about the awards your business has won. After all, this will give you some positive press. Celebrate your achievements and let your audience cheer for you too.

5 Press Release Examples to Inspire You

Perhaps one of the best ways to understand how to write a press release correctly is by consulting existing examples of press releases. This way, you will have a clear idea of what your result could look like.

The more press release examples you examine, the better your grasp on this writing technique will be, so here are a few such examples you will find useful.

1. Product launch from Apple

Product-launch-from-Apple

2. Show announcement from CNN

Show-announcement-from-CNN

3. Event announcement from Heinz

Event-announcement-from-Heinz

4. Executive promotion from eBay

Executive-promotion-from-eBay

5. Awards press release from Gerber

Awards-press-release-from-Gerber

Understanding the Press Release Format

Now that you have a much better idea of what a good press release looks like, you need to dive deeper into the structure of press releases. Even though there are different formats you can choose from, all of them have a more or less similar structure that you can use for creating your press release outline. Here’s how it goes:

  • Title and Subheading: Your press release needs to start with the obvious: the title and the subheading. It’s a good idea to italicize the subheading and make the font for it smaller to let the reader easily differentiate between the title and the subheading.

    Your title and subheading need to summarize your press release clearly and concisely while also being catchy to hook the readers. At the very top, consider adding “For immediate release”.

  • News Location and thrust: Your press release needs to start with the location of your news i.e. where the event takes place (event press releases), where the new product will be unveiled (new product launches), etc.

    In addition to that, you need to include the news thrust in your opening line. The news thrust or peg is the reason why you are writing the press release.

  • Main Information: This is where the body of your press release is and where you should write 2-3 paragraphs with the information about the matter at hand. It’s up to you how you word it and format it. For instance, you can include a bulleted or numbered list with some facts and figures.
  • Company Description and Contacts: After the body of your press release, you need to write a small paragraph about your company.

    Don’t forget to include your company’s contact information. At the very bottom, put “###” to signify that this is the end of your press release.

Final Thoughts

All in all, writing good press releases will benefit your marketing strategy and will help you spread the word about your business. Press releases are the perfect tool for promoting your brand and improving your reputation and authority.

And before you get down to write a press release, go through our checklist above for an effective piece. What’s more, once it’s out you can also promote it on your social media for more shares, and conversions.

For everything on how to schedule your social posts on time and get the most out of your social media promotion check out SocialPilot.

Frequently Asked Questions

🌟 When is a press release required?+

The best way to know whether you need a press release is to ask yourself the question: Is this newsworthy? If your readers will care about this piece of information, then it’s newsworthy and you need a press release.

🌟 How do you optimize a press release for search engines?+

Just like you do with any other piece of online content. Consider your audience, use relevant keywords, add internal and external links.

🌟 Do you need a quote for every press release you write?+

No. Unless this is some big news you are releasing to the public, you don’t need to use a quote.

🌟 Do you need visuals for every press release you write?+

Yes. Even a single image will be enough. Just don’t go overboard with your visuals. Press releases are always about the text you write, but a good image can attract more attention to it.

🌟 Should you only publish the press release on one platform?+

It depends. Most of the time, just posting it on a popular press release website will be enough for other media outlets to spread the message. But if your brand is fairly unknown, it could be a good idea to post the press release on several platforms instead of a single one.

The post How to Write a Press Release in 2021: Tips for Beginners appeared first on SocialPilot.

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Lending a voice to protect Indigenous Peoples

Lending a voice to protect Indigenous Peoples

Natalie Contreras, an Adobe employee and advocate for the rights of Indigenous peoples.

By Adobe Life Team

Posted on 08-12-2021

August 9 marked International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. Established in 1994, the day commemorates the first meeting of the UN Working Group on Indigenous Populations. The day is celebrated across the globe with cultural performances and events to bring awareness to issues affecting the world’s Indigenous communities.

To honor this holiday, we talked with Natalie Contreras, an Adobe employee and advocate for the rights of Indigenous peoples. Natalie joined Adobe through the Adobe Digital Academy, which offers individuals from nontraditional backgrounds an accelerated path to launching successful tech careers. She now manages the Adobe Digital Academy program, including the current cohort of interns and the alumni community networks.

Can you share a little about your heritage?

I identify as a multi-lineage descendant. My mom’s family is from the states in Northern Mexico of Michoacán, which is home to the Purépecha nation, and Durango, which is inhabited by the Tepehuán people. My dad’s family is from Mexico City and Jalisco, and those are Coca and Guachichil territories. My grandparents from both sides were in the Braceros Program as contract farm workers in the U.S. and eventually settled in what is now San Francisco, in the Mission District.

Why do you feel that Indigenous history is important?

I deeply appreciate the Mesoamerican cosmovision — that’s the larger interconnected scope of the Indigenous peoples across what some called “Turtle Island” (North America and South America). I connect to my Indigenous identity through traditional dance and song from these cultures. It’s a way to feel that interconnectedness with other communities.

I also want to acknowledge I’m a visitor on ancestral land of Indigenous Peoples. Where I was born, San Francisco, is known as Ramaytush Ohlone territory of the Yelamu tribe, and the names of the primary villages that were occupied by the Yelamu included a village site called Chutchui along Mission Creek, which is present-day Mission Dolores. It is important for me to speak on this because it’s important to acknowledge and center Indigenous people who have known and stewarded a relationship to the land, and whose descendants are alive today reclaiming their cultural heritage and traditions. I think it’s important to always give remembrance to the folks whose space I occupy.

Natalie dressed in traditional garb.

How did you start with traditional song and dance, and how does that allow you to connect with your heritage?

I was taking an ethnic studies class the summer before I went to college, and we had to do a presentation about cultural traditions. I begged my sister to take me across the bridge to a practice for a group that someone had started in the East Bay.

I really remember that day — as soon as I got out of the car, I could hear the drumming inside. When I opened the door, I was totally immersed, because you don’t just hear the music. You feel it.

I’ve now been dancing for over 12 years, with weekly practice and attending ceremonies like Indigenous Peoples Day on Alcatraz, as well as meeting with other Kalpullis who visit. Kalpulli is what we call these groups; it’s a Náhuatl word meaning house. It’s really cool because it’s all very intergenerational, and I love seeing it continue to represent many diasporas.

Why is International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples important?

There are people all over the world who are working against resource extraction in their communities, fighting for the right for sovereignty. It’s important to honor them and bring that global awareness to protect not just culture and traditions, but also the environment.

I’ve learned that Indigenous identity means being so much a part of the land that it no longer belongs to you; you are an essence of that land. We protect and we honor what we know is source and sustenance. It’s not just for ourselves — it’s for everyone.

How has the pandemic affected Indigenous communities?

In communities that were already facing a lack of resources and funding, the pandemic exacerbated those differences. The mortality rates are basically unheard of in some areas, and I think that’s being felt on a global scale. It has particularly endangered the elder community, which risks the loss of important culture, language, and history.

Simultaneously, some also had to evacuate due to wildfires in California last year. I wanted to help rally Indigenous leadership and give them tools and resources to help. I actually got to use my web development skills to help create a landing page for a local native tribe on the coast to help distribute relief grants across the community. We made the site accessible to people of all ages so community members could quickly update addresses and other information, which allowed relief to be distributed faster.

How can people help Indigenous communities?

That’s a really big question. Consider: What responsibility do I have? What can I contribute? How can I lend my voice?

I hope to raise awareness on the struggles of Indigenous people who are fighting for their right to access basic human rights, safe drinking water and sovereignty, and also to the disproportionate violence towards Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women Girls & Two Spirit relatives.

Here in the Bay Area, the Ohlone people are fighting to protect ancestral land and repatriate remains of traditional shellmounds. We also see headlines about the discovery of remains of Indigenous children in Canada. It’s critical to acknowledge and understand Indigenous issues and atrocities in order to make progress.

I encourage people to visit the Native Land app project to know the name of the people whose land you occupy; explore the Sogorea Te’ Land Trust, a matriarch-led group that advocates for the return of land to Indigenous people; and overall strive to understand local Indigenous perspectives.

Whether it’s lending your voice or supporting organizations that are doing work on the ground, you have lots of opportunities to raise awareness and defend Indigenous people.

Topics: #AdobeForAll, Brand, Adobe Life, Responsibility, Adobe Culture, Diversity & Inclusion

Products:

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Lending a voice to protect Indigenous Peoples

Lending a voice to protect Indigenous Peoples

Natalie Contreras, an Adobe employee and advocate for the rights of Indigenous peoples.

By Adobe Life Team

Posted on 08-12-2021

August 9 marked International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. Established in 1994, the day commemorates the first meeting of the UN Working Group on Indigenous Populations. The day is celebrated across the globe with cultural performances and events to bring awareness to issues affecting the world’s Indigenous communities.

To honor this holiday, we talked with Natalie Contreras, an Adobe employee and advocate for the rights of Indigenous peoples. Natalie joined Adobe through the Adobe Digital Academy, which offers individuals from nontraditional backgrounds an accelerated path to launching successful tech careers. She now manages the Adobe Digital Academy program, including the current cohort of interns and the alumni community networks.

Can you share a little about your heritage?

I identify as a multi-lineage descendant. My mom’s family is from the states in Northern Mexico of Michoacán, which is home to the Purépecha nation, and Durango, which is inhabited by the Tepehuán people. My dad’s family is from Mexico City and Jalisco, and those are Coca and Guachichil territories. My grandparents from both sides were in the Braceros Program as contract farm workers in the U.S. and eventually settled in what is now San Francisco, in the Mission District.

Why do you feel that Indigenous history is important?

I deeply appreciate the Mesoamerican cosmovision — that’s the larger interconnected scope of the Indigenous peoples across what some called “Turtle Island” (North America and South America). I connect to my Indigenous identity through traditional dance and song from these cultures. It’s a way to feel that interconnectedness with other communities.

I also want to acknowledge I’m a visitor on ancestral land of Indigenous Peoples. Where I was born, San Francisco, is known as Ramaytush Ohlone territory of the Yelamu tribe, and the names of the primary villages that were occupied by the Yelamu included a village site called Chutchui along Mission Creek, which is present-day Mission Dolores. It is important for me to speak on this because it’s important to acknowledge and center Indigenous people who have known and stewarded a relationship to the land, and whose descendants are alive today reclaiming their cultural heritage and traditions. I think it’s important to always give remembrance to the folks whose space I occupy.

Natalie dressed in traditional garb.

How did you start with traditional song and dance, and how does that allow you to connect with your heritage?

I was taking an ethnic studies class the summer before I went to college, and we had to do a presentation about cultural traditions. I begged my sister to take me across the bridge to a practice for a group that someone had started in the East Bay.

I really remember that day — as soon as I got out of the car, I could hear the drumming inside. When I opened the door, I was totally immersed, because you don’t just hear the music. You feel it.

I’ve now been dancing for over 12 years, with weekly practice and attending ceremonies like Indigenous Peoples Day on Alcatraz, as well as meeting with other Kalpullis who visit. Kalpulli is what we call these groups; it’s a Náhuatl word meaning house. It’s really cool because it’s all very intergenerational, and I love seeing it continue to represent many diasporas.

Why is International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples important?

There are people all over the world who are working against resource extraction in their communities, fighting for the right for sovereignty. It’s important to honor them and bring that global awareness to protect not just culture and traditions, but also the environment.

I’ve learned that Indigenous identity means being so much a part of the land that it no longer belongs to you; you are an essence of that land. We protect and we honor what we know is source and sustenance. It’s not just for ourselves — it’s for everyone.

How has the pandemic affected Indigenous communities?

In communities that were already facing a lack of resources and funding, the pandemic exacerbated those differences. The mortality rates are basically unheard of in some areas, and I think that’s being felt on a global scale. It has particularly endangered the elder community, which risks the loss of important culture, language, and history.

Simultaneously, some also had to evacuate due to wildfires in California last year. I wanted to help rally Indigenous leadership and give them tools and resources to help. I actually got to use my web development skills to help create a landing page for a local native tribe on the coast to help distribute relief grants across the community. We made the site accessible to people of all ages so community members could quickly update addresses and other information, which allowed relief to be distributed faster.

How can people help Indigenous communities?

That’s a really big question. Consider: What responsibility do I have? What can I contribute? How can I lend my voice?

I hope to raise awareness on the struggles of Indigenous people who are fighting for their right to access basic human rights, safe drinking water and sovereignty, and also to the disproportionate violence towards Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women Girls & Two Spirit relatives.

Here in the Bay Area, the Ohlone people are fighting to protect ancestral land and repatriate remains of traditional shellmounds. We also see headlines about the discovery of remains of Indigenous children in Canada. It’s critical to acknowledge and understand Indigenous issues and atrocities in order to make progress.

I encourage people to visit the Native Land app project to know the name of the people whose land you occupy; explore the Sogorea Te’ Land Trust, a matriarch-led group that advocates for the return of land to Indigenous people; and overall strive to understand local Indigenous perspectives.

Whether it’s lending your voice or supporting organizations that are doing work on the ground, you have lots of opportunities to raise awareness and defend Indigenous people.

Topics: #AdobeForAll, Brand, Adobe Life, Responsibility, Adobe Culture, Diversity & Inclusion

Products:

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Does pineapple belong on pizza? Settle the debate with Adobe Sign

Does pineapple belong on pizza? Settle the debate with Adobe Sign

Illustration of pizza slices and the words "The Signature Ingredient".

By Adobe Document Cloud Team

Posted on 08-12-2021

Nothing brings people together quite like pizza, especially as more people return to the office and dine in groups. But are all pizzas created equal? How about a pineapple pie? Adobe surveyed 3,000 people to see how this sweet — yet polarizing — ingredient stacks up when it comes time to order-in at the office.

Pineapple pizza: Yay or nay?

The long-held debate around pineapple on pizza has gripped many at the dining table and the water cooler. It may seem surprising to some, but almost half (44 percent) of U.S. adults actually enjoy the topping, with 73 percent of people open to pineapple flavor combinations outside of the traditional Hawaiian-style toppings. For lovers of the sweet and salty combination, pineapple-friendly pairings that topped the chart were bacon and pineapple, pepperoni and pineapple, and sausage and pineapple. Different regions have different preferences too, with pineapple on pizza being most popular in the Rocky Mountains area and the West Coast.

On the other hand, 41 percent of U.S. adults say they really dislike pineapple pizza. We even asked Hawaiians where they stand on the matter, and more than one-third said it was a no-go for them. And when it comes down to the pineapple debate, each generation certainly has their own take: Gen Z (50 percent), Baby Boomers (43 percent), and adults ages 76+ (52 percent) are more likely to dislike the topping compared to Gen X (35 percent) and Millennials (37 percent).

So why are so many people opposed to this signature fruity ingredient? For 54 percent of U.S. adults, it’s an issue of not liking warm pineapple. For 51 percent of Gen Z and 42 percent of Millennials, the texture simply does not work. And, for a particularly picky 10 percent of American adults, liking pineapple on pizza is a relationship dealbreaker.

Pineapple pizza: Are you in or out?

Needless to say, when it comes to the workplace, people are also conflicted about pineapple pizza’s place at the conference table. We haven’t met many at Adobe who would turn down a free slice, but 34 precent of pizza eaters we surveyed would choose to skip a free work-provided meal altogether if pineapple was the topping of choice. Still, we’re all human: when it comes down to the last slice in the box, most people (53 percent) at the office would devour it. It’s (free) pizza after all.

We want to know how you stack up on the pineapple pie chart. Are you for or against pineapple on your pizza? Share your preference here using Adobe Sign and you could win free pizza (pineapple or not) FOR A YEAR.*

* A year’s worth of pizza to be awarded in the form of a $2,000 USD check. For Official Rules visit here.

Topics: Trends & Research, Insights & Inspiration, Document Cloud, Productivity, Future of Work

Products: Document Cloud, Sign,

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At home, at work, and in the community — Adobe Stock is helping visualize veterans beyond the battlefield

At home, at work, and in the community — Adobe Stock is helping visualize veterans beyond the battlefield

By Sarah Casillas

Posted on 08-12-2021

Creativity is powerful: it brings us together, helps lift us up in times of difficulty, and inspires us all to do more and be part of positive change in the world. At Adobe, we believe in Creativity for All. To that end, one of our goals at Adobe Stock is to expand the available imagery depicting underrepresented groups.

Many people may not realize this, but U.S. Military veterans and active armed services members are quite often inaccurately represented. Today, the U.S. Military is increasingly a workplace that is as diverse in terms of race, religion, gender, and sexuality as the rest of the civilian world. The stock photo, video, and graphics landscape should reflect this.

We released a creative brief, called Veterans Return, as part of the Adobe Stock Advocates program to help inform stock content creators about what kind of imagery is most in demand to accurately depict these groups. The creative brief asks both creatives and consumers of stock images to expand beyond typical, often narrow ways of representing people in the armed services. We hope to inspire creators to engage with veterans in the stock image landscape and expand our shared understanding of service, community, and identity.

Visual media like movies, television, and advertising shapes our understanding of the world and the people in it. Our ideas of various professions and workplaces are deeply influenced by how media represents them. Veterans, and members of the armed services generally, are no exception to this rule. From “All Quiet on the Western Front” to “Dunkirk”, the vast array of professions, experiences, and members of the military are portrayed as soldiers in the heat of battle. Not only is this largely unrepresentative of the diversity within the military, but it reinforces a stereotype that military life is young men at war.

Collage of 4 images with veterans and service members in thier uniforms.

Credits (clockwise from top left): Adobe Stock/Bowery Image Group Inc./Stocksy, Adobe Stock/Cavan Images, Adobe Stock/roza, Adobe Stock/Hero Images.

Beyond the warrior stereotype

One of the major stereotypes in stock images about veterans and active service members is that they’re always more or less in the heat of battle. It’s part of what Michael Isom, member of Adobe’s Veteran Employee Network (VEN) with over 20 years of military service, calls the “warrior stereotype,” which depicts members of the military as “middle-aged, typical-height-and-weight men” who are generally in heroic-seeming combat roles like Green Berets or Navy SEALS.

As many veterans will point out, most roles in the armed services are far removed from the battlefield. This video, part of the PBS Veterans Coming Home series, explains how much of the military depends on the support of trained mechanics, engineers, supervisors, medical professionals, etc. While these roles may not be center stage in Hollywood dramas, it’s important for them to exist accurately in stock images — just the same as any other reality.

When they’re not on the front line, veterans or service members are often depicted in entertainment and advertising media as being defined by their trauma, PTSD, or their inability to return to civilian life. This can be just as damaging a stereotype because it reduces complex human beings, and the many ways they adjust to civilian life, into caricatures defined by combat, violence, and mental illness.

“There’s a lot of cognitive dissonance,” says Isom. “The general perception is that we [veterans] are ‘heroes’ but that veterans have ‘baggage’ and I think that’s a gross overgeneralization.”

This dichotomy between the warrior stereotype and the wounded veteran puts members of the military and veterans into two categories: either the superhero patriot (an unrealistic fantasy) or the broken soldier (a one-dimensional person defined by their trauma). This leaves little room for the vast spectrum of ways people who have served exist in the world around us — as family members, community leaders, coworkers, and so on.

When reflecting on what he sees unifying the diversity of veterans and service members in the world, Isom returns to a core value: selfless service. “This is true across military organizations,” he says, “putting others before yourself and showing up for the community.”

Credit: Adobe Stock/VIA Films.

Seeing the values behind the uniform

Like many identities, being a veteran isn’t something that’s always immediately visible. It’s not something people wear on their sleeves all the time. In stock images, where clarity is important, there’s a temptation to rely exclusively on markers like clothes or weapons. But these images often come off as a cliche.

“It’s unfortunate to say, ‘Hey, we need images of vets. The only thing we can use are external identity markers like uniforms, dog tags, tattoos,’” says James Slaton, Adobe employee and San Francisco site lead, Adobe VEN. To many veterans, these kinds of visual cliches can feel reductive and off-putting.

The reality is that veterans generally dress and look like anyone else. Vets might decide to grow beards, wear business suits or baggy clothes, and dye their hair. This unseen multiplicity presents a challenge for stock image-makers to represent veterans with sensitivity while still providing content that can be used by brands trying to depict veterans. “I see the complexity in trying to portray veterans in a non-stereotypical way,” Slaton reflects.

Images that feel rooted in values and action can help us imagine ways to expand the ways veterans and service members are seen. This MetLife video, for example, focuses on veterans’ capacity for entrepreneurship, leadership, and mutual care. Bank of America’s Veteran Entrepreneur Lending Program highlights entrepreneurial veterans with unexpected stories as well. And veterans outreach programs at companies like Ford and Boeing mix images of veterans in and out of uniform within the context of workplace values.

Beyond adding important and much-needed nuance and diversity to how we view veterans, images that go beyond the uniform reach people in a deeper and more personal place.

As a veteran, says Slaton, “I’m going to identify with a photo of someone who has confidence, strength, or resilience, whatever that looks like, because I identify with those values.”

Two images of men looking off to the distance smiling.

Credits (from left): Adobe Stock/Maskot, Adobe Stock/Hero Images.

Getting veterans behind and in front of the camera

As part of the Advocates program, Adobe Stock has established the Artist Development Fund, a $500,000 creative commission program that awards artists from traditionally underrepresented communities financial support to help them realize their creative vision.

Along with the other Adobe Stock Advocates program creative briefs, Veterans Return is more than just a call for more diverse, inclusive, and nuanced representations of veterans and service members. It’s also a call to empower veterans behind the camera to document their world and diverse communities. Representation along all parts of the creative process matter when it comes to enriching and expanding the visual landscape.

Contributors wanted: Get inspired with Veterans Return and other Adobe Stock Advocates program creative briefs. Then upload your best work to share your vision and sell your images on Adobe Stock.

Topics: Creativity, Photography, Video & Audio, Government, Creative Cloud,

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How Adobe powers 21st-century learning

How Adobe powers 21st-century learning

Small child touching cubes with light.

By Chitra Mittha

Posted on 08-11-2021

The realities of the modern workplace present new and unique challenges to traditional education paradigms. It wasn’t so long ago that schools taught a core curriculum of “essential knowledge,” along with hands-on skills that would prove useful across many disciplines. But facts and skills now age much more rapidly than they used to.

Today, a world of information is available on demand — yet much of that information is outdated or inaccurate. Digital fluency has become an absolute “must-have” in almost every industry — yet technologies and even entire sectors can become obsolete overnight, requiring workers to re-skill and change careers multiple times throughout their lives.

In response to these challenges, educators are turning increasingly to a framework of “21st-century learning,” focusing on skills and content that will equip students to survive and thrive in their future careers — not only in technical disciplines, but also in the ever-expanding range of fields that leverage digital platforms in their day-to-day workflows.

Let’s take a closer look at the ideas these teachers advocate — and how Adobe is helping bring those ideas to life in classrooms around the world.

What is 21st-century learning?

The term “21st-century learning” defines a range of core competencies designed to help students navigate today’s fast-changing world. This framework represents a shift away from the old paradigm of memorizing “important facts,” toward an increased emphasis on critical thinking, self-directed learning, productive collaboration — and, in particular, digital literacy.

This shift is a crucial one for several key reasons. Now that we have a world of data at our fingertips, memorized facts are far less useful than the practical ability to find and interpret applicable information. As technical knowledge rapidly grows outdated, career growth depends on staying curious and trying new approaches. And as social connectivity surrounds us 24/7, clear communication and agile cooperation have become increasingly vital life skills.

Many of today’s students already live with these realities, having grown up in a fluid and highly personalized digital ecosystem. That means 21st-century learning is crucial for teachers who seek to keep education engaging and relevant. The first step is to take stock of the skills most essential for today’s students — and look for ways to cultivate those skills in the classroom.

21st-century skills in education for students

  • Learning Skills: The 21st-century learning paradigm begins with the “four Cs” — communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity. In a world where most work is collaborative, students need to understand how to communicate their ideas and questions within a group and apply their knowledge and talent toward that group’s common goal. At the same time, students need to be able to think critically about new information and to synthesize their existing knowledge into creative new perspectives and solutions.
  • Literacy Skills: The “four Cs” break out into a wide range of specific applications. For example, effective critical thinking requires not just digital media literacy, but also broader informational literacy, as well as technological literacy. Students need to know how to recognize inaccurate or questionable information on social media, how to self-educate and perform research using reputable sources, and how to navigate today’s rapidly evolving technological universe to keep their knowledge and skills relevant.
  • Life Skills: At the same time, these practical skills have to be balanced with life skills. Students need to learn to be flexible enough to adapt plans in response to changing circumstances, while also knowing how to take initiative on starting projects, and motivate their team members to achieve a shared goal. In this age of distractions, students also need to learn how to maintain focus and stay on task. And since networking is critical for career growth, students need to know how to expand and leverage their social connections for everyone’s benefit.

How does Adobe drive 21st-century learning?

To help students develop 21st-century skills, teachers must cultivate digital fluency across a wide range of class subjects and content formats. In fact, a 2017 EDUCAUSE report found that digital literacy is a core competency for the modern workplace, where most job roles require at least a base-level understanding of digital content creation — and full digital fluency greatly enhances a student’s employability.

Recognizing the critical importance of digital literacy in 21st-century learning, Adobe has taken a proactive role in helping faculty utilize digital tools and content in their classrooms. For example, Adobe offers step-by-step guides to help teachers integrate digital assignments into lesson plans using the Creative Cloud platform. Adobe also makes it easier for remote learners to transition back to the classroom with paperless worksheets that replicate the assignment workflows they recognize from home.

The bridge to digital transformation

On a broader scale, digital classroom experiences are only one component of the overall journey toward digital transformation. By replacing paper-based processes and filing systems with digital tools and workflows, schools can streamline communications and operations, gain deeper insights into each student’s progress, and pinpoint opportunities to reduce costs while delivering more impactful education.

At the administrative level, for example, Adobe Acrobat and Adobe Sign, help make paperwork paper-free for K-12 administrators, by enabling parents to e-sign digital consent forms and liability waivers. These forms can be signed from any connected device, freeing parents of the burden of physically traveling to the school just to sign a piece of paper. What’s more, Adobe Sign automatically and securely stores final signed documents and audit trails of every transaction — making it easy for staff to manage, organize, and search for any document, while reducing risk.

By integrating 21st-century learning approaches and digitally transformed environments, schools can equip students to thrive in a diverse range of careers, throughout many decades to come.

Find out more about how Adobe technology can encourage digital literacy by visiting the Adobe for Academics website. And visit the Education Resource Hub to explore a wide range of resources focused on paperless approaches that underpin a successful digital transformation.

As always, feel free to get in touch with questions on how to bring digital literacy and transformations to life for you and your students and staff. We’re here to help!

Topics: Digital Transformation, Insights & Inspiration, Future of Work, Education, Document Cloud, Produc

Products: Document Cloud, Acrobat, Sign,

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Adobe announces Adobe Experience Cloud for Healthcare expanding digital transformation capabilities to patient experience

Adobe announces Adobe Experience Cloud for Healthcare expanding digital transformation capabilities to patient experience

Man having a video conference with his doctor.

By Tom Swanson

Posted on 08-10-2021

When it comes to healthcare, consumers expect the same personalized digital experiences they’ve become accustomed to in other aspects of their lives like shopping, online banking or booking travel.

Healthcare brands looking to become trusted partners for their patients and members need to provide contextually relevant experiences across multiple channels while safeguarding consumers’ personal data. Adobe is expanding the customer experience management capabilities in Adobe Experience Cloud to healthcare industry, with Adobe Experience Cloud for Healthcare. The comprehensive offering is HIPAA-ready and built on Adobe Experience Cloud applications, empowering healthcare companies to improve quality of care, reduce costs, and accelerate the transformation of digital care.

Secure and personalized digital experiences

The healthcare offering will include Adobe Experience Cloud applications that can comply with HIPAA (I.e., “HIPAA-ready”) such as Adobe Experience Platform, Adobe Real-time Customer Data Platform (CDP) and Adobe Journey Optimizer in early 2022. Current HIPAA-ready Adobe applications include Adobe Marketo Engage, Adobe Experience Manager as a Managed Service, Adobe Connect as a Managed Service, Adobe Sign and Adobe Workfront.

By expanding Adobe Experience Cloud capabilities for healthcare, payors, providers, life sciences and pharmacy companies can create and deliver personalized digital experiences that safely use personal data to inform real-time, omnichannel experiences.

Key capabilities of the offering aimed at empowering patients and members to more actively manage their health include:

  • Data-driven decisioning – Through Adobe Real-time CDP, Adobe will enable activation of integrated healthcare and consumer data to surface actionable insights and improve the patient and member experience. Unified patient data, updated in real-time, enable healthcare brands to create and deliver personalized recommendations and reminders tailored to individuals’ unique needs.
  • Adherence to industry standards – Adobe Experience Platform provides proprietary privacy, security, and governance infrastructure which are based on healthcare industry standards allowing for effective, meaningful and safe utilization of data for the right purpose, at the right time.
  • Healthcare and life sciences ecosystem integrations – Seamless integrations with industry data, technology and implementation partners, including Accenture, Deloitte, Microsoft and Veeva will empower healthcare companies to manage key sales and marketing workflows, as well as patient and member data, easily and securely. This helps healthcare companies to improve outcomes, reduce cost, and increase customer loyalty.

Leading healthcare brands are participating in an early access program designed to prioritize best-in-class experiences across healthcare and life sciences. Additional brands including Pfizer, Mercy Health, Roche Diagnostics, CommonSpirit and Change Healthcare already use Adobe Experience Cloud applications to transform the digital healthcare experience.

Topics: Digital Transformation, News, Healthcare, Experience Cloud,

Products: Experience Cloud, Experience Platform, Marketo Engage, Experience Manager, Sign, Workfront

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Lending a voice to protect Indigenous Peoples

Lending a voice to protect Indigenous Peoples

Natalie Contreras, an Adobe employee and advocate for the rights of Indigenous peoples.

By Adobe Life Team

Posted on 08-12-2021

August 9 marked International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. Established in 1994, the day commemorates the first meeting of the UN Working Group on Indigenous Populations. The day is celebrated across the globe with cultural performances and events to bring awareness to issues affecting the world’s Indigenous communities.

To honor this holiday, we talked with Natalie Contreras, an Adobe employee and advocate for the rights of Indigenous peoples. Natalie joined Adobe through the Adobe Digital Academy, which offers individuals from nontraditional backgrounds an accelerated path to launching successful tech careers. She now manages the Adobe Digital Academy program, including the current cohort of interns and the alumni community networks.

Can you share a little about your heritage?

I identify as a multi-lineage descendant. My mom’s family is from the states in Northern Mexico of Michoacán, which is home to the Purépecha nation, and Durango, which is inhabited by the Tepehuán people. My dad’s family is from Mexico City and Jalisco, and those are Coca and Guachichil territories. My grandparents from both sides were in the Braceros Program as contract farm workers in the U.S. and eventually settled in what is now San Francisco, in the Mission District.

Why do you feel that Indigenous history is important?

I deeply appreciate the Mesoamerican cosmovision — that’s the larger interconnected scope of the Indigenous peoples across what some called “Turtle Island” (North America and South America). I connect to my Indigenous identity through traditional dance and song from these cultures. It’s a way to feel that interconnectedness with other communities.

I also want to acknowledge I’m a visitor on ancestral land of Indigenous Peoples. Where I was born, San Francisco, is known as Ramaytush Ohlone territory of the Yelamu tribe, and the names of the primary villages that were occupied by the Yelamu included a village site called Chutchui along Mission Creek, which is present-day Mission Dolores. It is important for me to speak on this because it’s important to acknowledge and center Indigenous people who have known and stewarded a relationship to the land, and whose descendants are alive today reclaiming their cultural heritage and traditions. I think it’s important to always give remembrance to the folks whose space I occupy.

Natalie dressed in traditional garb.

How did you start with traditional song and dance, and how does that allow you to connect with your heritage?

I was taking an ethnic studies class the summer before I went to college, and we had to do a presentation about cultural traditions. I begged my sister to take me across the bridge to a practice for a group that someone had started in the East Bay.

I really remember that day — as soon as I got out of the car, I could hear the drumming inside. When I opened the door, I was totally immersed, because you don’t just hear the music. You feel it.

I’ve now been dancing for over 12 years, with weekly practice and attending ceremonies like Indigenous Peoples Day on Alcatraz, as well as meeting with other Kalpullis who visit. Kalpulli is what we call these groups; it’s a Náhuatl word meaning house. It’s really cool because it’s all very intergenerational, and I love seeing it continue to represent many diasporas.

Why is International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples important?

There are people all over the world who are working against resource extraction in their communities, fighting for the right for sovereignty. It’s important to honor them and bring that global awareness to protect not just culture and traditions, but also the environment.

I’ve learned that Indigenous identity means being so much a part of the land that it no longer belongs to you; you are an essence of that land. We protect and we honor what we know is source and sustenance. It’s not just for ourselves — it’s for everyone.

How has the pandemic affected Indigenous communities?

In communities that were already facing a lack of resources and funding, the pandemic exacerbated those differences. The mortality rates are basically unheard of in some areas, and I think that’s being felt on a global scale. It has particularly endangered the elder community, which risks the loss of important culture, language, and history.

Simultaneously, some also had to evacuate due to wildfires in California last year. I wanted to help rally Indigenous leadership and give them tools and resources to help. I actually got to use my web development skills to help create a landing page for a local native tribe on the coast to help distribute relief grants across the community. We made the site accessible to people of all ages so community members could quickly update addresses and other information, which allowed relief to be distributed faster.

How can people help Indigenous communities?

That’s a really big question. Consider: What responsibility do I have? What can I contribute? How can I lend my voice?

I hope to raise awareness on the struggles of Indigenous people who are fighting for their right to access basic human rights, safe drinking water and sovereignty, and also to the disproportionate violence towards Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women Girls & Two Spirit relatives.

Here in the Bay Area, the Ohlone people are fighting to protect ancestral land and repatriate remains of traditional shellmounds. We also see headlines about the discovery of remains of Indigenous children in Canada. It’s critical to acknowledge and understand Indigenous issues and atrocities in order to make progress.

I encourage people to visit the Native Land app project to know the name of the people whose land you occupy; explore the Sogorea Te’ Land Trust, a matriarch-led group that advocates for the return of land to Indigenous people; and overall strive to understand local Indigenous perspectives.

Whether it’s lending your voice or supporting organizations that are doing work on the ground, you have lots of opportunities to raise awareness and defend Indigenous people.

Topics: #AdobeForAll, Brand, Adobe Life, Responsibility, Adobe Culture, Diversity & Inclusion

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Does pineapple belong on pizza? Settle the debate with Adobe Sign

Does pineapple belong on pizza? Settle the debate with Adobe Sign

Illustration of pizza slices and the words "The Signature Ingredient".

By Adobe Document Cloud Team

Posted on 08-12-2021

Nothing brings people together quite like pizza, especially as more people return to the office and dine in groups. But are all pizzas created equal? How about a pineapple pie? Adobe surveyed 3,000 people to see how this sweet — yet polarizing — ingredient stacks up when it comes time to order-in at the office.

Pineapple pizza: Yay or nay?

The long-held debate around pineapple on pizza has gripped many at the dining table and the water cooler. It may seem surprising to some, but almost half (44 percent) of U.S. adults actually enjoy the topping, with 73 percent of people open to pineapple flavor combinations outside of the traditional Hawaiian-style toppings. For lovers of the sweet and salty combination, pineapple-friendly pairings that topped the chart were bacon and pineapple, pepperoni and pineapple, and sausage and pineapple. Different regions have different preferences too, with pineapple on pizza being most popular in the Rocky Mountains area and the West Coast.

On the other hand, 41 percent of U.S. adults say they really dislike pineapple pizza. We even asked Hawaiians where they stand on the matter, and more than one-third said it was a no-go for them. And when it comes down to the pineapple debate, each generation certainly has their own take: Gen Z (50 percent), Baby Boomers (43 percent), and adults ages 76+ (52 percent) are more likely to dislike the topping compared to Gen X (35 percent) and Millennials (37 percent).

So why are so many people opposed to this signature fruity ingredient? For 54 percent of U.S. adults, it’s an issue of not liking warm pineapple. For 51 percent of Gen Z and 42 percent of Millennials, the texture simply does not work. And, for a particularly picky 10 percent of American adults, liking pineapple on pizza is a relationship dealbreaker.

Pineapple pizza: Are you in or out?

Needless to say, when it comes to the workplace, people are also conflicted about pineapple pizza’s place at the conference table. We haven’t met many at Adobe who would turn down a free slice, but 34 precent of pizza eaters we surveyed would choose to skip a free work-provided meal altogether if pineapple was the topping of choice. Still, we’re all human: when it comes down to the last slice in the box, most people (53 percent) at the office would devour it. It’s (free) pizza after all.

We want to know how you stack up on the pineapple pie chart. Are you for or against pineapple on your pizza? Share your preference here using Adobe Sign and you could win free pizza (pineapple or not) FOR A YEAR.*

* A year’s worth of pizza to be awarded in the form of a $2,000 USD check. For Official Rules visit here.

Topics: Trends & Research, Insights & Inspiration, Document Cloud, Productivity, Future of Work

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